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Uganda

 

Background

According to reproductive health experts in Uganda, 6000 Ugandan women die every year from preventable pregnancy and child birth related complications. Yet, if women could only deliver under skilled care, about 80 percent of these deaths could be prevented. The reasons for not delivering in a health facility are several. But the main ones in Uganda include financial limitations, long distances to health facilities coupled with lack of access to transport facilities, lack of decision making power among women, inability to afford the medical supplies that are often compulsory at health facilities, rude unmotivated health workers and preference for traditional child birth settings.

 

FHS Phase 1

To address these issues, in Phase 1 FHS Uganda set up a 'Safe Deliveries Project' that established both demand (vouchers for transport and maternal services) and supply-side initiatives (training health workers and provision of essential equipment, drugs and supplies).

To implement the intervention, vouchers and registers for the vouchers were distributed to participating 22 health facilities in the districts of Kamuli and Pallisa. Drugs, supplies and equipments were procured and distributed to all participating health facilities to supplement the requirements for safe, clean deliveries. In addition, payments were made to transporters once every two weeks after they had submitted their transport vouchers. Health units also received payments once a month according to the number of service vouchers collected during that period.

The pilot phase was for 3 months from December 2009 to February 2010. And by the end of the pilot only conducted in Kamuli District, health facilities were already overwhelmed by the surge in numbers seeking maternal services. The number of number of facility deliveries was less than 200 per month but this increased to more than 500 per month. 

FHS Phase 2

Following the success of the Safe Deliveries Project, the second phase of FHS Uganda will focus on developing on a more sustainable mechanism of financing and managing the project so that the gains can be sustained. In particular:

  • The team will explore different methods of mobilizing community resources for maternal and newborn health.  To address some of the challenges found in implementing the voucher study, they will introduce the use of community health workers, who will also provide health education and promotion about maternal and newborn health through home visits. This work will be done in Buyende, Kamuli and Iganga districts using a quasi-experimental design.
  • In Pallisa, the team will use action research methods to test different approaches for mobilizing financial, social and human resources that exist within the community for improving maternal and newborn health. 

FHS Partners

Makerere University School of Public Health

Makerere University School of Public Health

News and announcements from FHS Uganda

News
Impact of FHS community scorecard work highlighted on Ugandan TV

The Makerere University School of Public Health, has spent the last two years developing a community scorecard for Kibuku district in Uganda. Recent coverage on Ugandan television has highlighted the intervention’s contribution to improvements in maternal and newborn health service delivery, bolstered by the strength of partnerships with community members and officials at local and national levels.

New films on Community Score Cards from Uganda

FHS partner Makerere University School of Public Health is undertaking a Community Score Cards study, which is contributing to research on how leaders can work with the community and health workers to improve maternal and newborn health in Kibuku District. The use of the Community Score Card tool – a two-way and ongoing participatory tool for assessment, planning, monitoring and evaluation - aims to improve the performance of facilities and accountability by the different stakeholders who are responsible for improving the performance of facilities.

We are pleased to share two new films, produced by MakSPH, highlighting the research undertaken in Kibuku using the Community Score Card tool.

NEW SUPPLEMENT: Innovation in health systems in low- and middle-income countries

FHS is pleased to announce the publication of a new supplement in BMC Globalization and Health, titled Innovation in health systems in low- and middle-income countries. There is a growing interest in new technologies and innovative organizational arrangements as a means to improve a health system’s performance. However, only a small proportion of the many investments in innovations have been shown to have an impact on health system performance at scale. The papers in this series, published in Globalization and Health, analyze the factors that enable and constrain the emergence and diffusion of health system innovations. They bring alternative perspectives to this issue, based on diverse local contexts and different types of innovation. The aim is to provide a stronger basis for the formulation of strategies for managing health system change in low- and middle-income countries.

Recent FHS Uganda Publications

Publications

Between June 2017 and December 2018, Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH), in collaboration with Future Health Systems, implemented a Community Scorecard project focusing on maternal and newborn health service delivery and utilization in six sub-counties in Kibuku district in Eastern Uganda. This short film highlights some successes from this pilot.

Between 2017 and 2018, the Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH), in collaboration with the Future Health Systems Research Consortium, implemented a CSC project focusing on maternal and newborn health service delivery and utilization in six sub-counties in Kibuku District, in Eastern Uganda. The implementation was led by stakeholders in the district and comprised of sub county chiefs, Local council chair persons, Health Unit Management Committee chairpersons, Village health team members, community development officers, sub county level councilors and volunteers. This short film is based on the challenges of implementing the project and also explains how these challenges were handled.

FHS partner Makerere University School of Public Health undertook a Community Score Cards study, which contributed to research on how leaders can work with the community and health workers to improve maternal and newborn health in Kibuku District. The use of the Community Score Card tool – a two-way and ongoing participatory tool for assessment, planning, monitoring and evaluation - aims to improve the performance of facilities and accountability by the different stakeholders who are responsible for improving the performance of facilities. This film provides an overview of how to undertake a maternal and newborn community scorecard.

This issue brief describes the factors that facilitate the CSC implementation process, based on the lessons learnt from a CSC project on maternal and newborn health service delivery and utilization in six sub-counties of Kibuku district in Uganda. District and sub-county stakeholders led the implementation of the CSC, with support from Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH). Four rounds of scoring were undertaken between November 2017 and September 2018.

Beginning in June 2017, the Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH), in collaboration with Future Health Systems, has been implementing a CSC project focusing on maternal and newborn health service delivery and utilization in six sub-counties in Kibuku district, Uganda. As one of its exit strategies, the project carried out a qualitative study that explored ways of involving political leaders in the CSC process to ensure its sustainability.

Musoke D, Ssemugabo C, Ndejjo R, Ekirapa-Kiracho E and George AS (2018) Reflecting strategic and conforming gendered experiences of community health workers (CHWs) using photovoice in rural Wakiso district, Uganda, Human Resources for Health, 16:41, DOI: 10.1186/s12960-018-0306-8

Community health workers (CHWs) are an important human resource in Uganda as they are the first contact of the population with the health system. Understanding gendered roles of CHWs is important in establishing how they influence their performance and relationships in communities. This paper explores the differential roles of male and female CHWs in rural Wakiso district, Uganda, using photovoice, an innovative community-based participatory research approach.